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20121201
20121231
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business is looking good for 2013, but going over the fiscal cliff could change that. >> tom: and the u.s. treasury speeds up plans to sell its stake in general motors. is the automaker ready to stand alone? >> susie: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! >> tom: under the threat of a white house veto, the u.s. house of representatives is expected to vote tomorrow on the republican plan-b to avoid the fiscal cliff. house speaker john boehner thinks the house will okay the package, trying to turn the heat up on president obama to steer clear of automatic tax hikes and government spending cuts due to take affect in 12 days. still, as darren gersh reports, there are some signs the two sides are narrowing their differences. >> reporter: house republicans say they're still working on plan a: a big agreement with the president to cut spending and raise revenues, but they were pushing plan b today-- a tax hike for those making more than a million dollars. >> tomorrow the house will pass legislation to make permanent tax relief for nearly every american. 99.81% of the american people. then the presi
ground. >> susie: i'm susie gharb. the u.s. stock markeis expeed to be the world's best performer in 2013. that's the prediction of john rogers of the c.f.a. institute. he joins us tonight. >> tom: and new rules for health care also are around the corner. tonight, we look at how small businesses are preparing for the changes. >> susie: that and more tonight on nbr! >> tom: there's no deal, but the two sides are still talking. house speaker john boehner and president obama met earlier this evening at the white house in an effort to move forward the stalled fiscal cliff talks. there are now just 18 days before the tax hikes and spending cuts thatake up the clf take efft, and today, there were few signs of progress. as darren gersh reports, the tone of the talks, if anything, is getting worse. >> reporter: house democratic leader nancy pelosi may just have a second career as a stock analyst. her commentary on the markets today was dead on. >> so far, they trust that we would not be so stupid as to go over a cliff. >> reporter: but pelosi made clear what everyone knows-- time is running out t
‚ô™ >>> more yen selling. the u.s. dollar is rising further against the japanese currency on the foreign exchange market. the dollar has risen to the 85-yen level for the first time in 20 months. investors are selling yen on the tokyo foreign exchange on speculation policy makers at the bank of japan will agree to an inflation target proposed by the incoming administration. the new prime minister shinzo abe will take up office later in the day. analysts say the b.o.j. will likely further boost its monetary easing measures. the dollar is currently trading at 85.26-31 yen. ai uchida joins us now from the business desk for more on that. so ai, investors have been trading the dollar-yen quite dramatically over the last several weeks. >> that's right, catherine. just a month and a half ago that pair was trading in the mid 79-yen range. almost six whole yen weaker in just six weeks. a dramatic move indeed. so going forward, what can we expect? well, we spoke to disaburo nezo for his outlook. he is a senior executive fellow at fujitsu research institute. >> the yen's future is no
are springing back into action. and, if you used your smartphone to shop this christmas, you're in fashion. it was the year's top retail trend. we have that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! a dramatic cliff-hanger today between washington and wall street about the fiscal cliff. stocks initially sold off after senate majority leader harry reid predicted the economy would go over the cliff. speaking from the senate floor he said there's not enough time between now and the end of the year to reach a deal. but stocks erased their losses ithe final hour of trading on news that the house of representatives will reconvene on sunday night to resume talks. by the closing bell, the dow was down only 18 points, bouncing back from a triple digit loss, the nasdaq lost four, and the s&p slipped almost two points. so what happens next? and can lawmakers prevent an economic crisis by agreeing on a fiscal cliff deal? darren gersh reports. >> reporter: here is a measure of how bad things are now in washington. markets rallied on news the house will come back to work on sunday, even though there is no solution
." as the tax hikes and spending cuts approach, u.s. manufacturers saw business shrink last month. the institute of supply managemens purchasing magers index fell unexpectedly to 49.5, down from 51.7 in october. a reading below 50 means business has fallen back into contraction. the november statistic is the lowest since july 2009. the dow fell 60, the nasdaq down eight, the s&p 500 lost six. >> susie: jeff saut says investors seem to be ignoring bad news, and this is a bullish sign. he's managing director and chief investment strategist at raymond james. so jeff, not only are you bullish but you're also calling for a pretty decent santa claus rally. tell us why? >> well, i have learned over the 42 years in this business, susie, that it's pretty tough to put stocks to the downside in the ebullient month of december. i mean it's happened but it's a pretty rare event it just seems to be the holiday sentiment tend to its lift stocks. i think that is what will happen this kror because i'm not one that thinks we'll fall totally off the cliff. >> tell us more. you think there is going to be some kind
debate hits the floor of the u.s. house but not much progress is made. warren buffett and others tell lawmakers to look for more money from the estate tax. >> susie: i'm susie gharib. could another major bond-buying program be on the way? what we could hear tomorrow as federal reserve policymakers wrap up their two-day meeting. >> tom: ever wonder what goes into making those cardboard store displays? tonight, we look at how one box company is using them to reinvent itself. >> susie: that and more tonight on nbr! >> tom: an agreement to ease the fiscal cliff may not be wrapped up and waiting under your tree for christmas. senate majority leader harry reid said today it would be hard to get an agreement finished by the holiday, blaming the delay on republicans. not surprisingly, republicans say the president hasn't gotten serious about the talks. plenty of outside groups are offering up suggestions. and as darren gersh reports, they include warren buffett and some other big names in finance. >> reporter: there was some public movement in the fiscal cliff standoff today. instead of holdi
to 2030. they say the u.s. won't be the world's only superpower. the council says china will pass the u.s. economically a few years before 2030. the council's analysts say the u.s. will remain unrivaled in its ability to orchestrate all aspects of power including the military it the analysts say the japanese economy will gradually shrink as the population ages and the labor force contracts. they say japan will retain fourth place in terms of overall power, trailing only the u.s., china and india. the council experts say asian countries such as india and indonesia are likely to boost their military power. but they warn of an arms race in asia. if the u.s. scales back its military commitment in the region. they say some tionmay begin developing nuclear weapons. new car sales are fueling china's economy. sales grew 8.2% in november from the same time last year. officials say nearly 1.8 million units were sold last month. japanese firms lost out after chinese consumers boytted their vehicles over a territorial dispute. they saw a slight improvement last month. total new car sales this china w
, it looks like u.s. consumers are doing what they do best in mid-decmber: procrastinating. how are you doing on your holiday shopping? >> pretty poorly to be honest with you. my wife typically takes care of most of it. last year, i was definitely ahead of the me. i'm probably 75% to 80% done. fantastic. haven't started yet. hoping to get a jump start on it this trip. >> reporter: retail expert mike niemira says only half of americans polled recently have finished their holiday shopping. >> the consumer is behind on their completion. that means we rely much more on the next few days for it to pick up dramatically. >> reporter: because of all the fiscal cliff doom and gloom, retailers are worried. and perhaps they should be. after all americans think their personal finances will take a hit next year. and that might mean fewer gifts under the tree. >> we believe that the post black friday lull that we've seen in the last three weeks that consumers are spending at a very restrained rate simply because they don't have the money and there's a little bit of a fear factor out there. >> reporter: but
the united states? >> well, i think in the u.s. -- obously you've got your o decisions to make about your fiscal problems and your issues and obviously your president and congress are engaging in that at the moment. but in the u.k. we have done that, we have got ahead of the curve and you can see in measures, for example, of how competitive the economies are, the you can is steadily becoming more and more competitive. >> rose: there's also this, the united states is engaged in this great debate that's going on in the white house with speaker of the house john boehner and the president of the united states, barack obama. what would be the optimal outcome of that debate as you lo at as a man who's dealing with the same kinds of problems? >> i'd say two things. one is we do need a resolution of this problem. i think the most immediate short-term problem facing the world economy-- i stress the word short term" is the u.s. fiscal cliff. i think if that is not resolved that is going to cause considerable problem for the world and indeed for the u.s. economy and it's already had some impact on
policy. >>> in the u.s. president barack obama and republican house speaker john boehner are scrambling to avoid the looming fiscal cliff. they're trying to reach an agreement on how to tax the wealthy. the president offered to limit tax hikes for people earning more than $400,000 a year. instead of his original proposal of $250,000. but republicans are calling for more concessions. >> what we've offered meets the definition of balance. but the president is not there yet. >> boehner said he will submit a bill to the house later this week proposing higher taxes only on people with income over $1 million a year. white house spokesperson jay carney said the two sides are close to a deal. >> the president has demonstrated obvious willingness to compromise and to move more than halfway. toward the republicans. >> spending cuts and tax increases including hikes on the middle class are set to take effect in the new year. the democrats and republicans will need to reach an agreement before then or the u.s. could face a recession. >>> let's check on the markets for this wednesday morning. well,
among latino catholics. the u.s. catholic bishops waged an active campaign against the obama administration's decision to require employers, including many faith-based employers, to provide free coverage of contraceptive services. the bishops said that would be a violation of religio freedom. the administration tried to offer a compromise, but the bishops, joined by many evangelical groups, said the compromise didn't go far enough. several religious institutions filed legal challenges to the policy. this summer, the bishops organized what they called a "fortnight for freedom" to highlight their concerns. faith-based groups continued to be divided over economic issues. conservative activists supported massive cuts to the federal budget, arguing that it's immoral to leave debt to future generations. but broad-based interfaith coalition argued that it was immoral to make cuts that would hurt the poor. to underscore that point, a group of catholic sisters organized a project called "nuns on the bus," where they crisscrossed the country speaking out against the federal budget prop
but maintain the pace of 13.5%. still the u.s. economic outlook remains uncertain. the obama administration and the republicans are at a stand still to resolve the tax increases. here in japan the central bank has started to consider a concrete inflation target. this is in response to a request made by the incoming leader. policy makers reviewed the inflation goal at a board meeting on thursday. they aim to reach a conclusion at their next meeting in january. liberal democratic party leader wants to pull japan's economy out of deflation once the new administration is in place. he's asking the boj to sign a policy accord with the incoming coming to make the target 2%. the rate remains at around 0%. it averaged at the lower 1% range during the bubble era in the late 1980s. some boj officials insist they should study the inflation impact on people's lives if it should double. others agree it might make it difficult to steer monetary measures in strview of economic conditions. the bank of japan plans to exam how its inflation target should be sent and when it shoultd be reached. let's g let's g
modra in washington that has us heading for a cliff. a fiscal cliff. but are we? or is this, another myth in the making? for some insight, we turn to two seasoned observers both of whose books you'll want to as santa to leave in your stocking. bruce bartlett was an economic adviser to the supply-side icon jack kemp, and to two presidents -- ronald reagan and the first george bush. he got into hot water with his conservative cohorts when he wrote a widely quoted book critical of the second president bush. his most recent work is "the benefit and the burden: tax reform-why we need it and what it will take." yves smith is the founder and editor of the popular blog naked capitalism. after 25 years in the financial services industry, she now heads the management consulting firm aurora advisors. she's the author of this book: "econned: how unenlightened self interest undermined democracy and corrupted capitalism." welcome to you both. >> thank you. >> thank you. >> is the fiscal cliff just a metaphor? or is it for real? >> well, the cliff is an inappropriate metaphor. and it doeconjure up
out later. as proof, they argue congress and the president are already using disasters and war spending as loopholes to avoid making tough cuts. >> they are doing that on the one side, then proposing additional stimulus spending on the other side, and then claiming that sometime next year they'll come up with some savings. that's a very troubling formula to me. >> reporter: if a grand bargain doesn't come together in the next few days, we may fall off the fiscal cliff and then wait for a new congress to put the pieces back together in the new year. darren gersh, "n.b.r.," washingt. >> susie: well, roger altman is confident democrats and republicans will strike a deal and avoid falling off the fiscal cliff. he was deputy treasury secretary in the clinton administration and is now executive chairman and founder of evercore partners. >> susie: roger, so great to have you back on "nightly business report." >> thank you, susie. >> susie: nice to see you. why are you so optmistic there is going to be a fiscal cliff deal? >> i would cite two broad reasons, and then a few reasons speci
. >> my otuary. >> what would you want us to say? would music be in the first sentence or two? >> no, i will say exactly what i said to the meerning extras. many singers. here lies ricardo muti, a crazy man that spent all his life trying to find a correct qafer or quarter note. >> rose: in pursuit of that your life was. >> that is a dist. >> rose: b mushas be good to you. >> very, very good. you know, music is the only art. and i know this by experience that can bring people together. and make people to communicate even if they don't speak the same language, if they have different religions. so when you left lascala, why did you leave? >> as i said i was there for 19 years, longer than anybody elsement longer even than tuscanini and my relationship with the orchestra and chorus has been always for 19 years perfect. then when i had a fight with the administration, let's say, because i don't want to indicate this or that person, then everything became political. and in italy when something becomes political, and ntroversial, politically speaking then the only thing that you can do is to l
are christians and they put je'us on the national agenda and then people of all different religions and without any at all respond to that figure. >> why did thomas jefferson become consumed with revising the bible by omitting a lot of it in his own text of the bible as you began your book 'ith? >> well, presumably it's not because he didn't have anything else to do, i mean, he was a pretty busy guy in the white house but he ordered a couple books from england, a couple bibles and he sat there in the white house and he cut and paed a took out the miracles and took out the resurrection. heelieved jesus was a good guy, he believed he was one of the most important philosophers ever but he didn't like christianity and he was able to separate out christianity from jesus, say no to christianity and say yes to yeast. >> how many of the colonists, what percentage were religiously affiliated or had had religious beliefs in some specific denomination? >> i'm not sure the percentageí but much smaller percentage of churchgoers than we have now. something more on the order of, i don'tnow, one out of five r
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